Time shift indications

Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Small-bore Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
15 Posts
14 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
Hi folks,

As I have been using SCATT several times per week during lockdown, on the positive front my scores are trace are both improving. However it is pretty consistent for me that when I look at the timesheet graph my scores would be significantly higher at almost exactly (every time) 0.6 seconds before shot release. Is this indicative of a triggering problem, or something else?

This is 10M AR.

Here are two examples, and this is typical for what I see

1592438272343.png

1592438298503.png
 
Your highest shooting achievement
GB Team
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Over 10 years
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
90 Posts
112 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
Hi folks,

As I have been using SCATT several times per week during lockdown, on the positive front my scores are trace are both improving. However it is pretty consistent for me that when I look at the timesheet graph my scores would be significantly higher at almost exactly (every time) 0.6 seconds before shot release. Is this indicative of a triggering problem, or something else?

This is 10M AR.

Here are two examples, and this is typical for what I see

View attachment 1223

View attachment 1224
The first graph suggests a triggering problem - the score drops significantly during the last 0.2 seconds (the triggering time). The second trace suggests that triggering is not a significant problem as the score is fairly level during the last 0.2 sec.
The Distance trace will give you a better indication of what is happening to your aim during this last 0.2 sec. Ideally both the x and y traces (red and blue on the upper Distance graph) will be fairly flat during the last 0.2 sec (and should be similar for the whole of the last second). If one or other (or both) lines show a distinct slope in the last 0.2 sec, that is probably a trigger fault, especially if the direction is fairly consistent. The lower Distance graph is radial distance from the centre. This will also show up triggering faults (as will the Coordination graph, which is the average of the radial distance graph over all the shots in the practice). If this rises in the last 0.2 sec it indicates a triggering fault, but you need to look at the x and y traces to see which direction the trigger is being pulled in.
One other possible cause of reducing scores/increasing coordination trace during the last half second or so is staying on aim too long. If you are taking more than about 6 seconds on aim for a shot, you are taking too long (see the data in the 'Time' column) - take another breath and give it another go. There is an old saying - the first aim is the best aim. If you have a lot of green trace in the bull before you fire the shot - why are you waiting? You could have fired earlier!
Also, try to follow through for longer - you come off aim after only 0.1 sec after the shot is fired. Follow through should be for at least 1, and preferably 2 seconds.
 
OP
Modena
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Small-bore Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
15 Posts
14 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
Thank you Charles
 
Your highest shooting achievement
10m pistol French Championship qualifications
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Air Pistol
SCATT Experience
3 years
Joined
May 13, 2020
222 Posts
142 Helpful Votes
3 Best Q&A Answers
Hi Modena, since it is typical and repeated I would not think of triggering at all, which is by definition uncontrolled thus irregular. As CharlesD mentions I would think of a follow-through problem. I would guess that when you "decide" you want to release your shot you loose some concentration and stability and let your aiming drift away.

A good way to think of that follow-through is a comparison to boxing, karate or other martial arts: when you send a punch, if you aim at your opponent's body surface your speed starts decreasing before you reach it. You can imagine you want to hit a target way inside your opponent's body, meaning the surface is irrelevant, your goal is further. Same thing for shooting: your goal is further in time. When you are ready to release your shot, your goal is 2-3 seconds of stability later, whilst your index pressure increases, and the precise instant when the shot breaches is irrelevant.

Also I would suggest you read this article in Scatt Support, it pretty well explains what you must concentrate on in the last second.
David
 
Last edited:
OP
Modena
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Small-bore Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
15 Posts
14 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
Thank you David
 
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