SCATT Coordination Graph

Peter

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Please note, that the data displayed in this graph goes hand in hand with the Distance Graph.

Coordination Graph shows aggregate results based on the entire series of shots, therefore your averaged-out trajectories. It's impossible to pile up 10 shots with corresponding traces and make this visually understandable (the whole thing would be green from top to bottom). Here is where the graph comes in handy.

Check out how Coordination Graph looks like with a series shot by a casual shooter (Figure 1). Overall the graph looks rough and shows multiple jumps along the way. Also, notice how the graph ascends approaching the final 0.2 seconds indicating lost control over hold stability in the last fraction of the shot.

In contrast, here is how the performance of a high-profile athlete looks like (Figure 2). This graph has a very smooth line, no jumps, the line almost rests on the horizontal axis. On top of that, the graph actually descends approaching the shot, which is a clear sign of solid control over the gun.

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glg

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Central American Games bronze medal
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Small-bore Rifle
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How is that corrected?
 

glg

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Central American Games bronze medal
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Could you elaborate on your question, please? :unsure:
In standing position I do have an ascending coordination graph curve during the last 0,2 seconds. I wonder if there are some specific exercises or recommendations to improve this. Some people have recommended to release earlier but that doesn’t work consistently. It has also been mentioned that this could be triggering errors...
 
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Peter

Peter

Administrator
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Joined
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In standing position I do have an ascending coordination graph curve during the last 0,2 seconds. I wonder if there are some specific exercises or recommendations to improve this. Some people have recommended to release earlier but that doesn’t work consistently. It has also been mentioned that this could be triggering errors...
Makes sense now, thanks for the clarification!

Releasing earlier is not the best advice as far as I'm concerned. This is backed by another graph we are yet to cover in our Tips & Tricks - the time shift graph (it highlights a hypothetical change in results assuming the shot happened somewhere before it was actually taken). The thing is, it’s more beneficial for beginners and amateur shooters, as seasoned professionals are well aware that you can’t dodge a technical mistake by just executing a shot earlier (said mistake is going to happen anyway).

A smoother Coordination Graph could be achieved by thoroughly working on your consistency when it comes to how you approach each shot, meaning consistency in how you execute everything from bringing your weapon up to pulling the trigger, consistency in breathing, consistent heart rate, etc.

We hope to attract several coaches to the platform shortly, and it very well might be that someone far more knowledgeable will answer your question in more detail here ;)
 
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GB Team
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High-power Rifle
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Over 10 years
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A rise of the Radial Distance and Coordination traces in the last 0.25 seconds is most probably due to poor trigger release - either snatching or pulling in a direction that is not directly along the line of the firearm. It will show up on the trace as a relatively long blue section of the trace, often heading away from the mean position of the yellow trace (the immediately preceding 0.75 seconds). If the blue trace tends to head in one direction immediately prior to where it turns red (the point of aim at the instant of firing), that can give a clue as to which way the trigger is being pulled (trace moving to the left indicates trigger being pulled to the right in a rifle and probably (don't know for sure as I've never used Scatt with a pistol) pulled to the left for a pistol).
Ensure that the fleshy part of the finger mid way between the tip and the first joint is where your finger is resting on the trigger, that the finger is in the same vertical position on the trigger every time and that no part of the trigger finger is touching the rifle/pistol at any point other than the trigger itself. The finger tip should be square across the trigger (pointing straight out to the side at a rightangle to the line of the firearm) at the point of trigger release.
 
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Peter

Peter

Administrator
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Joined
Sep 9, 2019
358 Posts
254 Helpful Votes
2 Best Q&A Answers
A rise of the Radial Distance and Coordination traces in the last 0.25 seconds is most probably due to poor trigger release - either snatching or pulling in a direction that is not directly along the line of the firearm. It will show up on the trace as a relatively long blue section of the trace, often heading away from the mean position of the yellow trace (the immediately preceding 0.75 seconds). If the blue trace tends to head in one direction immediately prior to where it turns red (the point of aim at the instant of firing), that can give a clue as to which way the trigger is being pulled (trace moving to the left indicates trigger being pulled to the right in a rifle and probably (don't know for sure as I've never used Scatt with a pistol) pulled to the left for a pistol).
Ensure that the fleshy part of the finger mid way between the tip and the first joint is where your finger is resting on the trigger, that the finger is in the same vertical position on the trigger every time and that no part of the trigger finger is touching the rifle/pistol at any point other than the trigger itself. The finger tip should be square across the trigger (pointing straight out to the side at a rightangle to the line of the firearm) at the point of trigger release.
Your comments always deliver, Sir! A pleasure to have such an active community member eager to share his insight!
That's what we are here after all :)
 
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