SCATT Basic Question (what stat-column data stands for)

Primary Discipline
Centerfire Pistol
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Apr 13, 2020
2 Posts
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On the left of the screen there are columns of numbers, a couple of which I have no idea what they represent as they seem far from intuitive to me. If someone would please identify them I would greatly appreciate it.

#= shot number
D= direction from center
R= shot score
T=? (probably time, but from when to when?)
S1=? (absolutely no idea!)

I found nothing in the manual or searching online to identify the above.

Thanks!
 

Peter

Administrator
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Joined
Sep 9, 2019
287 Posts
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On the left of the screen there are columns of numbers, a couple of which I have no idea what they represent as they seem far from intuitive to me. If someone would please identify them I would greatly appreciate it.

#= shot number
D= direction from center
R= shot score
T=? (probably time, but from when to when?)
S1=? (absolutely no idea!)

I found nothing in the manual or searching online to identify the above.

Thanks!
Hello there,

T stands for Time: this parameter highlights the time the shooter spent aiming.
Recorded from the moment his aimpoint entered the target up to the shot release (when the trigger is pulled)

S1 shows you the average speed of your aimpoint during the last second before the trigger is pulled. Calculated in millimeters per second. Generally speaking, S1 can tell you how steady the gun was at the final stage of taking a shot. The lower the S1, the better one’s hold stability is.

R is the result and D is the direction your shot-hole has deviated from the very center, so like 3 o'clock or 7 o'clock

Hope this was helpful!

P.S. I'm going to move this thread to the Q/A category, as the answer might be useful to other users ;)
 
OP
D
Primary Discipline
Centerfire Pistol
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Apr 13, 2020
2 Posts
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Thank You!
 
Your highest shooting achievement
GB Team
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Over 10 years
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
73 Posts
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S1 shows you the average speed of your aimpoint during the last second before the trigger is pulled. Calculated in millimeters per second. Generally speaking, S1 can tell you how steady the gun was at the final stage of taking a shot. The lower the S1, the better one’s hold stability is.
DA/SA
Because S1 measures the average speed of the trace across the target during the last second (default Control Period), it is actually also the length of the trace across the target face, in mm (mm per second, for 1 second). Think of it as the length of a piece of string placed over the trace on the face of the target. Note that the trace length is proportional to the distance of the target being used (the length on a 300m target is 6x the length of the same trace on a 50m target).
 
Your highest shooting achievement
GB Team
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Over 10 years
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
73 Posts
78 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
T stands for Time: this parameter highlights the time the shooter spent aiming.
Recorded from the moment his aimpoint entered the target up to the end of the follow-through (red potion of the trace) - where he exited the target.
Peter,
I have not used Scatt Basic. Is T measured the same as Time in Professional? I always thought Time (Professional) was the time from the aim coming into the target area until shot release, rather than until the follow-through (red trace) exiting the target area. For most people the time from shot release until the trace exits the target area is fairly constant (ideally around 2 seconds, but often nearer 1 second!) so, if it is as you have said, Time still gives a good indication of consistency of time spent on aim before shot release. However, in UK prone fullbore (and smallbore), we encourage shooters to release the shot within 3-6 seconds after coming on aim or take another breath and repeat the aiming cycle. It is therefore helpful to understand whether Time measures to shot release or to follow-through exit from the target area. If the latter, could we have the option (in future software) to have Time measure up to shot release only?
 

Peter

Administrator
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Joined
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287 Posts
190 Helpful Votes
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Peter,
I have not used Scatt Basic. Is T measured the same as Time in Professional? I always thought Time (Professional) was the time from the aim coming into the target area until shot release, rather than until the follow-through (red trace) exiting the target area. For most people the time from shot release until the trace exits the target area is fairly constant (ideally around 2 seconds, but often nearer 1 second!) so, if it is as you have said, Time still gives a good indication of consistency of time spent on aim before shot release. However, in UK prone fullbore (and smallbore), we encourage shooters to release the shot within 3-6 seconds after coming on aim or take another breath and repeat the aiming cycle. It is therefore helpful to understand whether Time measures to shot release or to follow-through exit from the target area. If the latter, could we have the option (in future software) to have Time measure up to shot release only?
You are absolutely right on this one! Time (T) is recorded until shot release and stops there, so no follow-through.
My bad, just edited my initial reply above (y)
 
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