Online course i found

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Hi, i stumbled upon a training course by Hemant V. Jadhav. Does anyone have experience with his training course? Foresight shooting
 
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IronSight
Your highest shooting achievement
484 - SCATT Open Tournament (May 2020)
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He released a youtube video. Topic: How your stable stance affects your trigger operation. It makes sense to me.
Any thoughts?


 
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10m pistol French Championship qualifications
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Any thoughts?
Hi, great video, thank you very much for sharing.
However I do not very well follow all of the explanations and specifically the stance issue:

• The trigger/aiming concentration issue is well known although not consensual. Even some international-level trainers argue that operating the trigger should become an automatism and concentration should remain on aiming. There are different schools on that subject.
Anyway that is difficult to relate to stance more than stability in general.
• What I don't follow is that the video doesn't at all justify why the bad trigger operation would be caused by stance and not body or arm(s) or wrist stability in general. As for pistol shooting at least I don't agree at all: stance is by far easier to acquire, train and master, than shoulder/arm/wrist stability. Stance directly affects the way you want to control stability but this does not directly affect trigger op. When it comes to rifle standing position, my understanding is that upper-body position, relaxation and stability are far more difficult than stance at the feet level, and neither does it directly affect trigger op.
It doesn't contradict stance stability being a real issue but it simply doesn't at all explain why it would be related to trigger op, although this is the video's main subject.
• He also mentions the urge to breathe but here again I don't agree: experimented shooters have long mastered this issue, whereas for beginners the urge to breathe mostly generates upper-body contractions, specifically diaphragm and pectorals, which completely ruin your aiming. Nothing about stance there. In a second time, urge to breathe generates urge to shoot without control.

Also the "good" aiming pattern with a moving area smaller than the 10 ring is really top competition level whereas the "bad" one is beginner-level. It doesn't make sense comparing them, and stance stability problem even for an average shooter would certainly not have such a strong negative effect.

So all in all it is an interesting video and efforts to make these have to be supported as there are not so many, but to me this one is too misleading and lacking good explanation.
 
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Your highest shooting achievement
10m pistol French Championship qualifications
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Air Pistol
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
May 13, 2020
158 Posts
92 Helpful Votes
1 Best Q&A Answers
To continue on stance I happen to have a stance stability issue because I have a badly injured front-foot and don't have any stability control on this foot. As a result I need to have an almost perfect body stability and stance on my other foot. Sometimes though I loose stance and can feel the consequences rather precisely:

• When you loose stance your line of aiming (eye-rear-front-sights) waves aside in a parallel move, which you see in your aiming.
• To correct it you need to reorient your aiming, that is change it's angle. The only way you can do this is by contracting upper-body muscle, therefore loosing most of your overall body stability. It also takes time which is globally detrimental to a good shooting.
• Correcting balance preempts concentration and focus. You need to think about how to correct and meanwhile you let your aiming go awry.
• At that point your shooting attempt is already lost and you should abort it. Problem is that sometimes it took you too much time to detect that you were loosing stance, and you were already trying to correct your aiming without really feeling it. You still shoot but with totally random chances.

In my opinion, a very good stance takes time and practice to acquire and needs regular training. But in the mean time there are two things you can acquire much easier and faster, that will lessen the consequences of an irregular stance stability. Here are my two advices:

1. Train to better and faster detect lost of balance. This will help you decide earlier to abort your shooting attempt, before trying to correct balance without any chance. Basic balance exercises help increase your sensitivity at the feet and ankles level.

2. Train to actually and immediately abort your shooting attempt when you begin considering this alternative and loosing concentration. It is very difficult because you are so hardly tempted to correct whatsoever and take your shot. But it is a mind issue, not a shooting technique. It is easy to train and become an automatism. It is a must-do, there is no alternative to it.

David
 
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