New to SCATT - where to start?

Your highest shooting achievement
none
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
2 Posts
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I've got a MX02 which I've now setup and had a couple of brief sessions to start to see what data is available and I have a vague understanding of some of the figures. Is there a particular parameter to focus on initially? i.e. focus on 10a first and once that is better then you could move onto looking at y. I've attached a snapshot of a session - I'm in the process of trying to set up a new rifle btw.

SCATT_SESSION.jpg
 
Your highest shooting achievement
GB Team
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Over 10 years
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
73 Posts
78 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
I've got a MX02 which I've now setup and had a couple of brief sessions to start to see what data is available and I have a vague understanding of some of the figures. Is there a particular parameter to focus on initially? i.e. focus on 10a first and once that is better then you could move onto looking at y. I've attached a snapshot of a session - I'm in the process of trying to set up a new rifle btw.

View attachment 1222
Probably the most useful bits of data to focus on are:
Trace Length (S1: average speed over the last second x 1 second = distance your aim traces across the target face, which is the length of the piece of string if you laid it over the yellow and blue section of the trace. This is a measure of your 'wobble' and depends primarily on how steady you hold your rifle - the more stable your position and the more relaxed your hold the smaller this will be.).
S2 (similar to S1 but average speed over the last 250ms, which is the triggering period. Look especially at the ratio between S1 and S2 - ideally S2 should be no more than S1. If it is bigger, the probable cause is poor trigger action).
DA (the distance (in mm) between the average aim point during the last second (+ symbol on the Trace view) and the projected impact point. Note that the latter includes the 'throw' of the shot due to the muzzle lateral and vertical velocity at the instant of firing, and is dependent on the F-Coefficient (now renamed Ballistic Ratio) setting. This defaults depending on the firearm and nominal distance selected. DA is affected by how much you wobble (S1/S2) and how good your trigger action is.)
Stability of Aim (on the Info sheet. This is the extreme spread of your average aim points (the + symbols on the trace), across all the shots in the practice. It is a measure of how accurately and consistently you are aiming when you think the aim is good enough to fire a shot. You will only rarely score a possible if your Stability of Aiming is larger than the effective size of the bull - this is the widest separation between the middle of two 0.22" diameter shot holes that will both score 10 on opposite sides of the bull, about 7.7mm if my sums are correct). Note that this value will be invalidated if you adjust your zero at any time after the sighters.
If you monitor these values over successive practices (days/weeks) you will see whether or not your performance is improving.

10a0 and 10a5 are quite useful, but your 10a0 is already 100% nearly all the time, so won't show any progress. 10.0 and 10.5 are affected by how accurately your sights/Scatt are zeroed (and will change from day to day). While a good score is nice, this is not an essential part of practicing with Scatt - the metrics above are much more important for monitoring your progress.

A couple of observations on your trace above:
Your approach is to a point slightly to the left of the centre. This is probably your Natural Point of Aim (NPA), which is therefore slightly off centre. The move of your aim into the centre of the target is therefore done by muscle control, which should be avoided if possible. Get your NPA well aligned with the centre and it won't be necessary to use any muscles to get a good aim.
Your time on aim (T) is rather long - 3 to 6 sec is ideal. More than a couple of seconds of green trace in the middle is a waste of a good aim - have the confidence to let the shot go! Too long on aim and you get retina burn, diminishing your ability to judge a good aim, with the aim often drifting off.
Other than that, you trace looks very good!
 
OP
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Your highest shooting achievement
none
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
2 Posts
1 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
Thanks Charles, that's really helpful
 
Your highest shooting achievement
10m pistol France championship qualifications
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Air Pistol
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
May 13, 2020
99 Posts
64 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
Hi dhbiker,
You can read this on Scatt support. Skip setup articles directly to the practice advice. Scatt also provides here a list of downloadable export files from "famous shooters", they are interesting to look at as they show examples of good and consistent data tables from the shots. The link is from the Q&A support which is very useful reading thoroughly.
David
 
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