Approach angle

Your highest shooting achievement
British Short Range Champion 2019
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Small-bore Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Jul 17, 2020
14 Posts
8 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
I'm aware that my approach to the bull is from the right (5-o'clock) although I'm not aware of it through the sights. I suspect that's why I take so long to release the shot as I'm waiting for the bull to centre in the foresight. Comments?
 

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HLo

SCATT Rookie
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
Small-bore Rifle
SCATT Experience
Less than 1 year
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
4 Posts
3 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
I think it is fine as long as the you get a good shot. Which seems to be the case :cool:

If I had to make negative talking points about it, I would say that taking aim from straight 6 o'clock could get you a better sight picture faster, thus having less time spent aiming and thus suffering less eye fatigue over the match / session. I also do not see your breathing (cycle) either, even with the longest aims.

About the file attached.. I do not have much experience but I am going to comment anyway!
1st shot: it seems that you came from 5 o'clock but never went the needed travel to left to get to bull. It seems as you pretty much just pressed the trigger while making small adjustment towards the bull but it worked!

6th shot: It started and landed on the right, never really crossing the bull. So in this shot I would say that you would have lost against yourself who aims from 6 o'clock.

8th shot: it came pretty much from 6 o'clock and landed well. Did you attempt this? Quite same thing with 10th and 7th.

Your recoil goes straight to 9-10 o'clock but is clearly repetive. Do you think your recoil input is good / working? I have not tried Scatt slinged/positioned yet so I am not so sure how it might look with different body setups.
 
Your highest shooting achievement
GB Team
Skill Level
Amateur/Hobby Shooter
Primary Discipline
High-power Rifle
SCATT Experience
Over 10 years
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
78 Posts
92 Helpful Votes
0 Best Q&A Answers
I'm aware that my approach to the bull is from the right (5-o'clock) although I'm not aware of it through the sights. I suspect that's why I take so long to release the shot as I'm waiting for the bull to centre in the foresight. Comments?
I'm a left hander too. When shooting prone, if your Natural Point of Aim (NPA) is properly aligned with the aiming mark, every time you breathe in, the foresight should go down to around 5-6 o'clock and the aiming mark should no longer appear in your foresight. As you breathe out to your naturally exhaled state (don't stop short or force air out) your foresight should stop with the aiming mark perfectly centred. If it doesn't, pivot around your right elbow by moving your hips left or right and forwards or backwards until at your naturally exhaled state, the aiming mark is in the middle. Test by closing your eyes, relax, breathe in, breathe out to the naturally exhaled state, 'feel' your aim, then open your eyes and see where your aim is pointing. If not perfectly aligned on the aiming mark, adjust as above.
NPA is where your rifle points when you are completely relaxed - let your arms go completely floppy and try to drop the rifle - if your handstop is in the right position and the sling tension is correct the rifle should stay horizontal.
I can't open Expert files (I only have Pro software) so can't see your traces, but from what has been said by you and HLo above, it sounds as though your NPA is not correctly aligned. If it was, your aim would come directly into the middle from around 5-6 o'clock every time you breathe out and stop with your aim inside the bull. With the NPA correctly aligned you are, in effect, aiming with your diaphragm, simply by breathing. There should be no need to use any muscles to get your aim into the middle. If you are properly aligned, then you only need a few seconds on aim to verify that the aim is good and release the shot with a gentle squeeze. Shot release should ideally be between 3-6 seconds from coming on aim. If you are taking longer, the aim clearly isn't good, so just take another breath and have another go. It doesn't matter how many breaths you take before you fire the shot, just so long as you only fire when the aim is good. If you only pause your breathing cycle for the 3-6 seconds you are on aim, you maintain the oxygen levels in your blood and you will find your eyes are much less tired by the end of the card/competition than if you are staying on aim (breathing suspended) for longer.
 
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