10a0

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Peter

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10a0 represents the percentage of time your Aimpoint was within the “absolute 10-ring" (imaginary 10-ring drawn around your AAP) in the last second before the shot (control time intervals can be adjusted in your settings).

This parameter should be explored when a shooter doubts his/her calibration, suspects that the sights are slightly off or a shooter suffers from astigmatism, yet the hold stability remains solid. Generally speaking, 10a0 could be utilized by virtually any shooter depending on what subtlety needs to be addressed during the practice session (one could very well practice his/her hold stability with alternative areas on the target rather than the bulls’ eye, for instance). This parameter comes in handy for shooters with decent hold stability but lackluster sighting/aiming when they need to objectively evaluate their hold stability ”in a vacuum”.

This parameter shall be treated differently compared to the 10.0 one that was covered in our previous post. Even though this is a relative variable, a shooter should focus on keeping the 10a0 percentage as high as possible. Thus, the closer you are to 100%, the better!

Feel free to share your personal tips in regards to the 10a0 parameter in the comment section below
 
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As with the 10.0 tip post, the first sentence is not strictly correct (unless the F Coefficient is set to zero). You can have an aimpoint trace that is completely within the 'absolute 10 ring' during the last second (control period) which does not give a 100% value for 10a0. 10a0 actually measures the percentage of the last second that would have resulted in a score of 10.0 or better if the shot had been fired at that instant (similarly a score of 10.5 or better for the 10.5 metric) and the Average Aim Point (AAP) had been exactly in the centre of the bull. Even if your aimpoint trace was within the 'absolute 10 ring', if it was moving outwards towards the edge of the 'absolute 10 ring' at the time you fired, the projected shot can end up outside the 'absolute 10 ring' (see the tip on DA). As well as the direction and speed of movement of the aim point, the proximity to the edge of the 'absolute 10 ring' at the moment of shot release and the value of the F Coefficient will affect the probability of the shot landing outside the 'absolute 10 ring'. Change the F Coefficient and you will see the values of 10a0 and 10a5 change.
 
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Hi. Why is it that when I send a scatt file by email to someone they are not able to import it into their scatt application in order to view it?
 
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Hi. Why is it that when I send a scatt file by email to someone they are not able to import it into their scatt application in order to view it?
If they find the folder 'Scatt Catalog' on their C Drive and save the file in that folder, it will appear on the list of files when they open the Scatt application and select 'Open document'. It will be in a folder with your name on it in a folder identified by the distance/target type that you used.
They can also open the file directly by going into the 'Scatt Catalog' folder and selecting the file, which will have a file name that starts with your name (as you recorded it when you started the practice) followed by the date and then the time.
 
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Peter

Peter

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Hi. Why is it that when I send a scatt file by email to someone they are not able to import it into their scatt application in order to view it?
Is there an error message popping up? What SCATT software are we talking about?

Should not be happening with SCATT Pro files, as long as the recepient got SCATT Pro installed on his/her PC
You can double-click the file and it should automatically boot it in SCATT Pro
Alternatively, you can right-click and then select "Open with..." to setup these files opening up in Pro by default

CharlesD has also outlined a working solution above
 
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Change the F Coefficient and you will see the values of 10a0 and 10a5 change.
Quite true, and in my opinion it is a flaw regarding the training purpose of the AAP. The F coefficient only reflects the consequence of the aiming trace speed at the breach instant, which has nothing to do with the aiming point. I think the 10a0 (as well as 9a0 and 10a5) percentage calculation should exclude the F coefficient altogether, and only the shot score should be affected by the F coeff.

In my experience you can have a kind of arm/wrist instability in which you can't really slow your moves but manage to control their amplitude better along the time, therefore increase your AAP scores. For instance I can hardly slow my small instability moves below 200 (in Scatt Expert) but with training my DA has already dropped from ~15 to around 10 or less, as well as the average size of my aiming zone. Consequently the F coefficient, which correctly simulates the actual score on the target, excessively affects the measurements of my averages.
As a result when I do exercises for stability training I have to set the F coefficient at 0, which allows me to compare these technical training sessions along time and measure my improvements. Then I set it back to the usual value of 10 for match training.
 
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Quite true, and in my opinion it is a flaw regarding the training purpose of the AAP. The F coefficient only reflects the consequence of the aiming trace speed at the breach instant, which has nothing to do with the aiming point. I think the 10a0 (as well as 9a0 and 10a5) percentage calculation should exclude the F coefficient altogether, and only the shot score should be affected by the F coeff.

In my experience you can have a kind of arm/wrist instability in which you can't really slow your moves but manage to control their amplitude better along the time, therefore increase your AAP scores. For instance I can hardly slow my small instability moves below 200 (in Scatt Expert) but with training my DA has already dropped from ~15 to around 10 or less, as well as the average size of my aiming zone. Consequently the F coefficient, which correctly simulates the actual score on the target, excessively affects the measurements of my averages.
As a result when I do exercises for stability training I have to set the F coefficient at 0, which allows me to compare these technical training sessions along time and measure my improvements. Then I set it back to the usual value of 10 for match training.
Where the (real) shot ends up on the target is a combination of where the firearm is pointing at the instant of firing and how the muzzle is moving, as this will impart a vector (combination of lateral and vertical) velocity onto the bullet/pellet which will 'throw' it in the direction the muzzle was moving by a distance that is proportional to the speed at which the muzzle was moving. The F-Coefficient/Ballistic Ratio is the proportion factor, and differs for each calibre of firearm.
The movement of the muzzle is a combination of how steady your hold and aim is, and how good your trigger release is (how much it disturbs your hold and aim).
By setting the F-Coefficient/Ballistic Ratio to zero, you are removing this 'throw', which means you are only measuring where your rifle/pistol was pointing at the moment you fired. In essence this only measures how accurately you 'see' a good sight picture (good enough to feel confident in releasing the shot). It is like shooting with a laser rather than a bullet/pellet, and is only half the story of how well you are shooting.
The 10a0 and 10a5 statistics are essentially the same as the 10.0 and 10.5 statistics, except that they remove the effect of your average aim point not being perfectly centred, either through incorrect zero or natural aiming errors (no shot is ever perfectly centred except by chance). 10a0 and 10a5 tell you how well you could keep all your shots in the 10 or X ring IF you could fire perfectly aimed shots and your zero was perfect. Even if you keep your trace inside a 10 ring sized area, you will not always get a 10 because of the 'throw' induced by muzzle movement - if the muzzle was moving towards the edge of the 10 ring zone at the moment you fire, you could end up 'throwing' the shot out and 10a0 recognises this in its calculation. Some people deliberately set their F-Coefficient/Ballistic Ratio to a high value, as they find this helps them to improve their hold, aim and trigger release during training (see other threads).
It is still possible to see performance over time through 10a0 and 10a5 whatever value the F-Coefficient/Ballistic Ratio is set to. The numbers will still reduce as your performance improves (indeed they will appear to reduce faster with a high value of F-Coefficient/Ballistic Ratio, so you will have a clearer indication of the rate of improvement).
 
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Hi CharlesD,

I do very well understand what the F ballistic coefficient is. However data such as 10a0 measures an average of your moves (shown as trajectory traces), whereas the ballistic is only affected by the barrel move exactly at breach. By the way I would be very interested in having Scatt calculate and display the speed at that instant. This precise speed with some coefficients induce the shift of the projectile trajectory during the few milliseconds it travels through the barrel. Once again this has nothing to do with any of the 10.0, 10a0 and similar, S1, S2 and DA, which are averages at a much larger timescale before breach.
For that reason in my opinion any of the averages in the data tables should not be modified at all by the F ballistic coefficient.

As our last comments are diverging from Peter's thread about 10a0, I'm going to start a new one in the suggestions forum. The F coefficient is crucial because it perfectly represents a reality, and I think it would be better associated with someting like the trace speed exactly at breach, as well as the measurement of the shift in mm induced on the target due to that speed, i.e. the score penalty of instability at breach.
 
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I would be very interested in having Scatt calculate and display the speed at that instant. This precise speed with some coefficients induce the shift of the projectile trajectory during the few milliseconds it travels through the barrel. Once again this has nothing to do with any of S1, S2 and DA, which are averages at a much larger timescale before breach. For that reason in my opinion the S1, S2 and DA data tables should not be modified at all by the F ballistic coefficient.
I agree absolutely - a value of speed at the instant of firing would be very useful. S1 and S2 have their uses (especially the ratio between S2 and S1, which shows up triggering faults), but not as useful as the speed at the instant of firing.
F-Coefficient does not affect S1 and S2, but does affect DA, Score, 10.0, 10.5, 10a0 and 10a5. Comparisons of these values over time should only be done using the same F-Coefficient to monitor improvements. However, F-Coefficient can be changed on a recorded shoot and the values will change to reflect the new F-Coefficient. So for any one recorded shoot you can see what the values would be for your usual settings of 0. 10 and 50, regardless of the value that was used when you recorded the file.
 
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Peter

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By the way I would be very interested in having Scatt calculate and display the speed at that instant.
I agree absolutely - a value of speed at the instant of firing would be very useful.
It is useful indeed, that's why we already have it, heh ;)
Albeit, not separately for every shot but rather an average for that series (which is arguably more useful)

If you toggle the Average Speed Graph, the point where the graph coincides with the y-axis highlights the speed exactly at moment of your shot release. Here, for instance, the shooter's speed was equal to 108 mm/s (on average) for this series the moment he/she pulled the trigger.
1589802756685.png
You guys obviously know this, I just wanted to leave an illustration for other readers
But yeah, I can see how the "current shot" speed graph could be a fine addition to Expert
 
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It is useful indeed, that's why we already have it, heh ;)
Add it for individual shots, you already have the data
 
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It is useful indeed, that's why we already have it, heh ;)
Albeit, not separately for every shot but rather an average for that series (which is arguably more useful)

If you toggle the Average Speed Graph, the point where the graph coincides with the y-axis highlights the speed exactly at moment of your shot release. Here, for instance, the shooter's speed was equal to 108 mm/s (on average) for this series the moment he/she pulled the trigger.
View attachment 968
You guys obviously know this, I just wanted to leave an illustration for other readers
But yeah, I can see how the "current shot" speed graph could be a fine addition to Expert
It would be helpful to have the speed value at the instant of firing displayed adjacent to DA for each shot, as the speed is a significant factor in the size of DA - seeing the two values next to each other makes it easier for shooters to understand why an unusually large (or small) DA has suddenly appeared (and why the projected 'throw' of the impact point (breach) from the aim point at the instant of firing is the size it is). To have to look at the speed graph to get the information is a very long-winded way to understand the outcome of the shot. As a training aid, working to reduce the speed at the instant of firing is at least as, if not more, important as S2.
 
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Hence an additional data column that can be selected in parameters just like S1, S2 and DA. Maybe the order should be S1, S2, SB (Speed at Breach) then DA

Probably when reaching a reasonably good level monitoring S2 and speed at Breach (SB) may be more useful than S2 vs. S1, just like the 9a0 ratio becomes less significant than 10.5 or 10a5.
 
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